MISSISSIPPI BURNING

MISSISSIPPI BURNING

Thursday 29 Mar 2018 - 7:00pm to 9:00pm
Admission: 
£3

Mississippi Burning is perhaps the most famous film about the civil rights movement in the 60s.

30TH ANNIVERSARY SCREENING

The film is a crime-drama that is loosely based on the real-life murders of three civil rights workers in 1964 in Mississippi. The film chronicles two fictional FBI agents, Alan Ward (Willem Dafoe) and Rupert Anderson (Gene Hackman), as they try to discover the truth while investigating the murders. The backdrop of the civil rights struggle is perpetuated by the relationship between Ward and Anderson. Ward is a young liberal from the north, and he takes the "direct approach" with the investigation. Anderson, however, is a former Mississippi Sheriff, and quite familiar with the intricacies of race relations in the south.

Perhaps the most important legacy of the film is its accurate portrayal of life in the south during the civil rights movement. It was a volatile time in American History, and Mississippi Burning captures that with its many complexities.

Won an Oscar®.

“Feels like a movie made from the inside out, a movie that knows the ways and people of its small Southern city so intimately that, having seen it, I know the place I’d go for a cup of coffee and the place I’d steer clear from.

This acute sense of time and place – rural Mississippi, 1964 - is the lifeblood of the film. More than any other film I’ve seen, this one gets inside the passion of race relations in America.”

- Roger Ebert, rogerebert.com

Director: 
Alan Parker
Cast: 
Gene Hackman, Willem Dafoe, Frances McDormand
Country: 
USA
Certificate: 
18
Duration: 
2hrs.8mins
Year: 
1988
Admission
£3